Recent Posts

Post Construction Cleaning

6/13/2017 (Permalink)

Structural integrity, materials, labor, safety, customer satisfaction and deadlines - the list goes on and on when building a commercial facility. The bottom line, however, is you are responsible for getting the doors open on time.  SERVPRO professionals can help you meet your deadlines by providing thorough post-construction services in a timely manner.

These services include the following:

Post Construction Cleaning- Debris removal services to prepare the building for interior design.

Dehumidification and Drying- During the construction phase, a building can trap moisture. Excessive moisture could result in mold growth.  

Final Cleaning - Cleaning services, including carpet and floor cleaning, deodorization, air duct cleaning, and ceiling,walls and fixture cleaning, to give the building that extra shine prior to the facility opening its doors. 

The last thing you need is a fire damage, water intrusion or mold growth slowing down or stopping the completion of one of your projects. SERVPRO provides 24 hour emergency mitigation, cleanup and restoration services to help you get back on schedule quickly. 

Commercial Cleaning Needs

6/13/2017 (Permalink)

When you need it done right and done fast, call SERVPRO for all of your commercial cleaning needs. When you hire SERVPRO for maintenance cleaning, you get around-the-clock restoration services built with you in mind. Quality cleaning and a quick response - that's the SERVPRO way. 

Can't figure out how to get the job done? Call us for your emergency restoration needs. Because when you experience a fire, water or mold damage in your facility, you need fast response and the expertise to get the job done right, ensuring your business can get back into operation as quickly as possible. Through it all, you expect the most reliable information and the very best service at a fair price. 

SERVPRO is committed to providing fire and water cleanup and restoration services to reduce business interruptions and recovery costs.

SERVICES OFFERED 

Fire, Smoke and Soot Cleanup and Restoration

Water Removal and Dehumidification

Crime Scene, Biohazard and Vandalism Cleanup

Mold Mitigation and Remediation

Contents Claim Inventory Service

Air Duct and HVAC Cleaning

Carpet and Hard Floor Cleaning and Care

Stain Removal, Stain Resistance Applications

Odor Identification and Deodorization 

Upholstery and Drapes:Wet or Dry Cleaning Method

Recipe for Safety

6/12/2017 (Permalink)

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) research, cooking is the leading cause of home fires. Two of every five home fires begin in the kitchen-more than any other place in the home. Cooking fires are also the leading cause of home fire-related injuries. Most of these fires start because people aren't paying attention. While a few minutes may not seem like much time to be away from what's cooking, that is all it takes to start a fire. 

Leaving cooking unattended and other unsafe kitchen practices are a recipe for disaster. Review the cooking safety tips provided below to learn how to help prevent kitchen fires before they start.

- Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. 

- When you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly, stay in the home, and use a timer to remind you. 

- Keep cooking areas clean and clear of combustibles such as towels, drapes, and pot holders. 

- Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a "kid free zone" of three feet around the stove. 

- If an oven fire starts, turn off the heat and keep the door closed. If the fire does not go out, get out of the home and call the fire department. 

- If you have a fire in your microwave, turn it off and keep the door closed. Don't open the door until the fire is completely out. If in doubt, get out of the home and call the fire department. 

- Always keep an oven mitt and a lid nearby. If a small grease fire starts in a pan, smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan (wearing the oven mitt). Do not move the pan. To keep the fire from restarting, do not remove the lid until it is completely cool. NEVER pour water on a grease fire. 

Severe Weather Preparedness

6/12/2017 (Permalink)

Severe weather can happen any time, anywhere. Being prepared to act quickly can be critical to staying safe during a weather event. Knowing your risk of severe weather, taking action and being an example are just a few steps you can take to be better prepared to save your life and assist in saving the lives of others. 

The first step to becoming weather-ready is to understand the type of hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could impact you and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly, obtain a NOAA Weather Radio, and learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts. Severe weather comes in many forms and your shelter plan should include all types of local hazards. 

Take the next step in severe weather preparedness by creating a communications plan for your family. Put together or purchase an emergency kit. Keep important papers and valuables in a safe place. 

Once you have taken action to prepare for severe weather, share your story with family and friends on Facebook or Twitter. Your preparedness story will inspire others do the same. 

Severe Weather Safety-General

4/10/2017 (Permalink)

Hundreds of people die each year in the United States due to heat waves, hurricanes, lightning, flash floods, powerful thunderstorm winds, and winter storms or winter cold. Additionally, thousands of people are injured by these weather events each year.  If you are aware of what weather event is about to impact your area, you are more likely to survive such an event. To stay on top of the weather, utilize NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards receiver units that can be purchased at most electronic stores. Make sure the model you purchase has a battery-backup. You should also obtain the latest weather information from commercial TV/radio, cable TV, the internet/web, and newspapers. It’s your responsibility! 

What else can you do to prepare for severe weather?

  • Develop a disaster plan for you and your family at home, work, school, and when outdoors. The American Red Cross offers planning tips and information on a putting together a disaster supplies kit at www.redcross.org.
  • Identify a safe place to take shelter.
  • Know the county in which you live or visit – and in what part of that county you are located. The National Weather Service issues severe weather warnings on a county basis.
  • Check the weather forecast before leaving for extended periods outdoors. Watch for signs of approaching storms.
  • If severe weather threatens, check on people who are elderly, very young, or physically or mentally disabled. Don’t forget about pets and farm animals.

Severe Weather Safety - Lightning & Flash Flood/Flooding

4/10/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Severe Weather Safety - Lightning & Flash Flood/Flooding Severe weather safety tips

Lightning Safety Tips:

  • Postpone outdoor activities if thunderstorms are imminent. Lightning can travel 5-10 miles away from the thunderstorm and strike the ground with blue sky overhead.
  • Move to a sturdy shelter or vehicle. Do not take shelter in a small shed, under isolated trees, or in a convertible-top vehicle. Stay away from tall objects such as trees or towers or poles.
  • If in your vehicle when lightning strikes – don’t touch a metal surface. You are safer in a vehicle than being outdoors.
  • Remember that utility lines or pipes can carry the electrical current underground or through a building. Avoid electrical appliances, and use telephones or computers only in an emergency.
  • If you feel your hair standing on end – get down into a baseball catcher’s position and plug your ears with your finger tips so if lightning does hit it will not blow your ear drums out. Do not lie flat!
  • 30/30 rule – if the time between lighting and thunder is 30 seconds or less, go to a safe shelter. Stay there until 30 minutes after the last rumble of thunder.

For more information on lightning safety go to www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov.

Flash Flood/Flood Safety Tips:

  • Nearly half of all fatalities in a flash flood involve a person driving a vehicle. Do not drive into a flooded area – Turn Around Don’t Drown! It takes only 2 feet of water to float away most cars. It’s amazing how powerful we feel when we get behind the wheel – don’t do it!
  • It takes only 6 inches of fast-moving water to sweep a person off their feet – don’t walk through a flooded area!
  • If you are camping in a river valley, move to higher ground if thunderstorms with heavy rains are in the area. Do not attempt to drive away.
  • Don’t operate electrical tools in flooded areas.
  • Most flash flood deaths occur in the middle of the night when it is more difficult to see rising water levels judge the depth of water covering road surfaces.

Severe Weather Safety - Straight Line Winds/Large Hail

4/10/2017 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Severe Weather Safety - Straight Line Winds/Large Hail Car damaged by hail

Severe Thunderstorm Straight-line Winds:

  • Don’t underestimate the power of strong thunderstorm winds known as straight-line winds – they can reach speeds of 100 to 150 mph. Hurricane-force winds start at 74 mph. Illinois does experience these kinds of winds!
  • If a severe thunderstorm warning contains hurricane-force wind speeds seek shelter immediately (as you would for a tornado situation).Stay away from windows and go to the basement or interior room/hallway. Do not use electrical appliances.
  • Be aware that tall trees near a building can be uprooted by straight-line winds – that tree can come crashing through the roof of a home and crush a person to death.
  • Powerful straight-line winds can overturn a vehicle or even make a person air-borne when they get up over 100 mph!
  • One type of a straight-line wind event is a downburst, which is a small area of rapidly descending rain-cooled air and rain beneath a thunderstorm. A downburst can cause damage equivalent to a strong tornado!

Large Hail:

  • Although it is rare, people have been killed by large hail stones after sustaining head injuries. Additionally, several people are injured by large hail stones each year in the U.S.
  • Some thunderstorms can produce large hail stones that can reach the size of baseballs, softballs, or even as big as computer compact discs (CD) or DVDs! These large hail stones can fall at speeds over 100 mph! – that’s why they are dangerous!
  • If a severe storm is producing large hail stones, seek a sturdy shelter and stay away from windows that can easily be smashed.
  • If you are in your vehicle before the hail storm starts, get out of it and go to a sturdy shelter. Glass windows in vehicles can easily be smashed by the hail stones. If you can’t get out of your vehicle, then come to a stop and cover your head with your arms and hands.  

What to do if you Suspect Mold

3/30/2017 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation What to do if you Suspect Mold Mold can spread through a home in as little as 48 hours

If you see visible mold, do not disturb it.  You can inadvertently spread the mold infestation throughout your home.  When mold is disturbed, the mold can release microscopic mold spores which become airborne and can circulate inside your home.

What to Do:

  • Stay out of affected areas.
  • Turn off the HVAC system and fans.
  • Contact SERVPRO of Joliet for mold remediation services

What Not to Do: 

  • Don't touch or disturb the mold.
  • Don't blow air across any surfaces with visible or suspected mold growth.
  • Don't attempt to dry the area yourself.
  • Don't spray bleach or other disinfectants on the mold.

About Our Mold Remediation Services

SERVPRO of Joliet specializes in mold cleanup and restoration. Our crews are highly trained restoration professionals that use specialized equipment and techniques to properly remediate your mold problem quickly and safely.

If you see signs of mold, call us today - (815) 436-5735.

 

Should I or Shouldn't I?

1/12/2017 (Permalink)

Community Should I or Shouldn't I? 'Tis the season for colds and flus

Will you catch pneumonia if you go outside with a wet head in winter?? Ever wonder what are really health tips and what are old wive's tales? Well this article from WebMD answers those questions about some common practices we do to try and keep us germ free.

Use hand sanitizer: Worth it

“Hand sanitizers have gotten better in recent years,” explains Charles Gerba, PhD, a germ expert and environmental biologist at the University of Arizona. Look for one that contains 60% alcohol. That's the amount needed to kill germs. 

You don’t have to overdo it, Gerba says. Use it once or twice during a typical day, as well as after using public transportation, when you get home, or before you eat (if you can’t wash your hands).  

Wash your hands constantly: Not (necessarily) worth it 

Turn off the faucet with a paper towel: Worth it

“The faucet handle is the most contaminated surface in a restroom,” Gerba says. Using the same towel to open the restroom door on the way out is also a good idea. 

Skip the hand dryer: Worth it

These machines aren’t only annoyingly loud, but they could be hazardous to your health. Studies find that a jet air dryer spreads 1,300 times more germs than paper towels . Use paper towels if available, or air dry your hands.

Use a paper toilet seat cover: Not worth it

The porcelain throne is actually one of the cleanest spots of a public restroom because they’re often cleaned with disinfectants, Gerba says. 

If it gives you peace of mind, go for it, but that thin piece of paper isn’t going to do much good, since fluid can go right through it, says Philip Tierno, PhD, microbiologist and clinical professor of pathology at New York University. But chances are good you’re not going to come in contact with anything that can infect you, he says. 

Touch elevator buttons with your knuckle or sleeve: Worth it

The ground-floor button, which everyone touches, can get especially grimy, Gerba says. 

Avoid shaking hands or hugging people who appear ill: Worth it

Explain that you’re not being rude; you’re protecting your health. Both experts say they avoid touching friends and relatives who are sick, especially if they’re coughing and sneezing.

Keep your fingers off your face: Worth it

Touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with germy hands is a surefire way to get sick. And you may be doing it more than you realize. One study found the average adult touches their face about 16 times per hour.

Bring your own yoga mat to class: Worth it 

Doing downward dog can deliver plenty of health benefits, but your yoga mat can also be a prime place for germs, Tierno says. Make sure to clean it with antibacterial wipes after every use.

Wipe down gym equipment: Worth it

Working out can play a role in boosting your immune system, but exercise equipment is pretty dirty. One study found the virus that causes the common cold is present on 63% of gym machines. Protect yourself from germs as you work out by wiping gym equipment with a towel before using it. (Tierno suggests using your own towel and marking an X on the “dirty” side.) 

Wear a surgical mask on airplanes: Actually worth it!

It’s not overkill, Tierno says, especially if someone behind, beside, or in front of you is sneezing and coughing. Any further away, you’re probably safe. 

Preventing Frozen Pipes

12/5/2016 (Permalink)

Water Damage Preventing Frozen Pipes Frozen pipes can cause major damage

Being prepared and informed may help you to avoid the messy and often expensive issue of frozen pipes. Water has a unique property in that it expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the "strength" of a container, expanding water can cause pipes to break. Pipes that freeze most frequently are those that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hose bibs, swimming pool supply lines, water sprinkler lines, and water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets. Pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation are also subject to freezing.

Before the onset of cold weather, prevent freezing of these water supply lines and pipes by following these recommendations:

 

  • Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.
  • Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located in unheated areas. Look in the basement, crawl space, attic, garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated.
  • Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes. Newspaper can provide some degree of insulation and protection to exposed pipes – even ¼” of newspaper can provide significant protection in areas that usually do not have frequent or prolonged temperatures below freezing.
  • Keep garage doors closed if there are water supply lines in the garage.
  • Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals up out of the reach of children.
  • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing.
  • Keep the thermostat set to the same temperature both during the day and at night. By temporarily suspending the use of lower nighttime temperatures, you may incur a higher heating bill, but you can prevent a much more costly repair job if pipes freeze and burst.
  • If you will be going away during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55° F.

Hopefully taking these preventative measures will help you get through the winter without any frozen pipes.  If you should find yourself with a water issue from a broken, frozen pipe, know that SERVPRO of Joliet is standing by to assist you in your time of need.